Quan Yin

One of the deities most frequently seen on altars in China's temples is Quan Yin (also spelled Kwan Yin, Kuanyin; in pinyin, Guanyin). In Sanskrit, her name is Padma-pni, or "Born of the Lotus." Regarded by the Chinese as the goddess of mercy, she was originally male until the early part of the 12th century and has evolved since that time from her prototype, Avalokiteshvara, "the merciful lord of utter enlightment," an Indian bodhisattva who chose to remain on earth to bring relief to the suffering rather than enjoy for himself the ecstasies of Nirvana. One of the several stories surrounding Quan Yin is that she was a Buddhist who through great love and sacrifice during life, had earned the right to enter Nirvana after death. However, like Avlokiteshvara, while standing before the gates of Paradise she heard a cry of anguish from the earth below. Turning back to earth, she renounced her reward of bliss eternal but in its place found immortality in the hearts of the suffering. In China she has many names and is also known as "great mercy, great pity; salvation from misery, salvation from woe; self-existent; thousand arms and thousand eyes," etc. In addition she is often referred to as the Goddess of the Southern Sea -- or Indian Archipelago -- and has been compared to the Virgin Mary. She is one of the San Ta Shih, or the Three Great Beings, renowned for their power over the animal kingdom or the forces of nature. These three Bodhisattvas or P'u Sa as they are know in China, are namely Manjusri (Skt.) or Wn Shu, Samantabhadra or P'u Hsien, and Avalokitesvara or Quan Yin.

Quan Yin is a shortened form of a name that means One Who Sees and Hears the Cry from the Human World. Her Chinese title signifies, "She who always observes or pays attention to sounds," i.e., she who hears prayers. Sometimes possessing eleven heads, she is surnamed Sung-Tzu-Niang-Niang, "lady who brings children." She is goddess of fecundity as well as of mercy. Worshipped especially by women, this goddess comforts the troubled, the sick, the lost, the senile and the unfortunate. She is now also regarded as the protector of seafarers, farmers and travelers. She cares for souls in the underworld, and frees the soul of the deceased from the torments of purgatory.




Product Image Item Name+ Price
Eleven-headed Avalokiteshvara

Eleven-headed Avalokiteshvara

Seated in a diamond posture upon a Viswapadmasana throne of double lotus petals, this eight-armed Avalokiteshvara has 11 heads ascending pagoda-like...
$125.00

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Seated Quan Yin with Ruyi

Seated Quan Yin with Ruyi

Seated in a position of ease, this Blanc de Chine porcelain Quan Yin is the epitome of elegant serenity. Her elongated earlobes, symbol of wisdom,...
$450.00

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Standing Quan Yin with Scroll

Standing Quan Yin with Scroll

This elegant Blanc de Chine porcelain Quan Yin stands with her long robes swaying in soft, graceful folds, as if fluttering in a mild breeze. Her...
$395.00

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